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Most Nigerians Not Meeting Fruit Intake Requirement – Nutritionist

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A renowned nutritionist, Dr. Bisi Abiola has identified cultural and natural restrictions as the major problems preventing a greater percentage of Nigerians from meeting the recommended daily fruit servings.

Abiola, Managing Director of Indulge Nigeria Limited, said this in her latest monthly healthy living discourse, a platform that reviews the positive role that fruit juice can and does play in a healthy diet

During the series sponsored by Chivita, the nutritionist said Nigerian culture does not recognise fruit as satisfying enough to stand as a diet. This, she noted, is one of the reasons many people do not pay serious attention to fruit consumption.

The expert regretted that the few people who have risen above the confine of unfavourable culture to embrace fruit meal are often confronted with convenience and suitability challenges.

To enjoy the benefits of fruit all seasons, Abiola urged health-cautious and busy individuals to embrace 100% pure fruit juice, which she described as a perfect substitute for whole fruits.

She, however, cautioned consumers to pay attention to labels while shopping to ensure that they buy pure fruit juice, saying: “If 100% fruit juice is not clearly written on the pack, it is likely not a pure fruit juice.

“The truth is that 100% fruit juice is proven to have similar or exactly same nutrition as fresh juice does, straight from a fruit without added sugar or preservatives. In other words, 100% fruit juice is nutrient-dense beverage that provides vitamins, minerals (folic acid, thiamine and magnesium) and beneficial plant nutrients like polyphenols.

“When fruit juice is 100%, it counts as one portion of fruit, which is not onlyconvenient but also helpful as many Nigerians do not meet their daily fruit quota for the maintenance of good health.

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First Baby Born Via Womb Transplant From Dead Donor

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In a medical first, a mother who received a uterus transplant from a dead donor gave birth to a healthy baby, researchers reported Wednesday.

The breakthrough operation, performed in September 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, shows that such transplants are feasible and could help thousands of women unable to have children due to uterine problems, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The baby girl was born in December 2017, the medical journal added.
Until recently, the only options available to women with so-called uterine infertility were adoption or the services of a surrogate mother.

The first successful childbirth following uterine transplant from a living donor took place in 2014 in Sweden, and there have been 10 others since then.

But there are far more women in need of transplants than there are potential live donors, so doctors wanted to find out if the procedure could work using the uterus of a woman who had died.

Ten attempts were made — in the United States, the Czech Republic, and Turkey — before the success reported Wednesday.
Infertility affects 10 to 15 percent of couples.

Of this group, one in 500 women have problems with their uterus — due, for example, to a malformation, hysterectomy, or infection — that prevent them from becoming pregnant and carrying a child to term.

“Our results provide a proof-of-concept for a new option for women with uterine infertility,” said Dani Ejzenberg, a doctor at the teaching hospital of the University of Sao Paulo.

He described the procedure as a “medical milestone”.

“The number of people willing and committed to donate organs upon their own death are far larger than those of live donors, offering a much wider potential donor population,” he said in a statement.

The 32-year-old recipient was born without a uterus as a result of a rare syndrome.

Four months before the transplant, she had in-vitro fertilisation resulting in eight fertilised eggs, which were preserved through freezing.

The donor was a 45-year-old woman who died from a stroke.

Her uterus was removed and transplanted in surgery that lasted more than ten hours.

The surgical team had to connect the donor’s uterus with the veins, arteries, ligaments, and vaginal canal of the recipient.

To prevent her body from rejecting the new organ, the woman was given five different drugs, along with antimicrobials, anti-blood clotting treatments, and aspirin.

After five months, the uterus showed no sign of rejection, ultrasound scans were normal, and the woman was menstruating regularly.

The fertilised eggs were implanted after seven months. Ten days later, doctors delivered the good news: she was pregnant.

Besides a minor kidney infection — treated with antibiotics — during the 32nd week, the pregnancy was normal.

After nearly 36 weeks a baby girl weighing 2.5 kilograms (about six pounds) was delivered via caesarean section.

Mother and baby left the hospital three days later.

Four months before the transplant, she had in-vitro fertilisation resulting in eight fertilised eggs, which were preserved through freezing.

The transplanted uterus was removed during the C-section, allowing the woman to stop taking the immunosuppressive drugs.

At age seven months and 12 days — when the manuscript reporting the findings was submitted for publication — the baby was breastfeeding and weighed 7.2 kilograms.

“We must congratulate the authors,” commented Dr. Srdjan Saso, an honorary clinical lecturer in obstetrics and gynaecology at Imperial College London, describing the findings as “extremely exciting”.

Richard Kennedy, president of the International Federation of Fertility Societies, also welcomed the announcement but sounded a note of caution.

“Uterine transplant is a novel technique and should be regarded as experimental,” he said.

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Lack of Sleep Intensifies Anger – New Study

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A new research from Iowa State University has confirmed a link between sleep loss and anger intensity.

The study, which was published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology found that losing a few hours of sleep can make a person angrier, especially in frustrating situations.

“Other studies have shown a link between sleep and anger, but questions remained about whether sleep loss was to blame or if anger was responsible for disrupted sleep,” Zlatan Krizan, professor of psychology at Iowa State, said.

“Despite typical tendencies to get somewhat used to irritating conditions — an uncomfortable shirt or a barking dog — sleep-restricted individuals actually showed a trend toward increased anger and distress, essentially reversing their ability to adapt to frustrating conditions over time. No one has shown this before.”

Study participants were randomly split into two groups; one maintained their sleep routine and the second restricted their sleep by two to four hours each night for two nights.

Together with Garrett Hisler, an ISU doctoral student, Krizan measured anger in the participants before and after sleep manipulation by gauging their reaction to noise.

“In general, anger was substantially higher for those who were sleep restricted,” Krizan said.

“We manipulated how annoying the noise was during the task and as expected, people reported more anger when the noise was more unpleasant. When sleep was restricted, people reported even more anger, regardless of the noise.

“It is well established that sleep loss increases negative emotions, such as anxiety and sadness, and decreases positive emotions, such as happiness and enthusiasm.”

Krizan says they found sleep loss to uniquely impact anger, and not just result from feeling more negative at that moment.

Based on the results, the researchers are now collecting data to test if sleep loss causes actual aggressive behaviour toward others.

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NAFDAC, Customs Set Up Joint Committee To Tackle Importation Of Counterfeit Products

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According to a statement signed by the Director, Public Affairs, NAFDAC,  Abubakar Jimoh, the establishment of the joint committee was the fall out of the courtesy visit by Director General of NAFDAC, Professor Moji Adeyeye to the Nigeria Customs Comptroller General, Retired Colonel Hameed Ali recently in Abuja.

The Customs boss said it has become imperative for NAFDAC and NCS to close rank and work together in the interest of Nigerians, particularly the youths and house wives who are exposed to the devastating effects of abuse of codeine containing cough syrups and tramadol illegally shipped into the country.

He pointed out the urgent need for NAFDAC and NCS to put in place quick measures to prevent Nigerian politicians from taking undue advantage of our vulnerable youths and getting them hooked to drugs so they can be used as thugs during electioneering campaigns.

In her response, NAFDAC DG, Professor Adeyeye hinted that the newly established joint committee will come up with action plan on Intensive Education, Training and Foreign Exchange Programme for personnel of both Agencies as well as joint enforcement operations.

She said other areas of collaboration include timely examination of suspected containers based on intelligence report, regular invitation of NAFDAC officials to participate in examination of NAFDAC regulated products, support to NAFDAC to prevent clearing agents from false declaration of consignments and timely release of containers to NAFDAC for destruction after seizure notice has been submitted to NCS.

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