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Most Nigerians Not Meeting Fruit Intake Requirement – Nutritionist

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A renowned nutritionist, Dr. Bisi Abiola has identified cultural and natural restrictions as the major problems preventing a greater percentage of Nigerians from meeting the recommended daily fruit servings.

Abiola, Managing Director of Indulge Nigeria Limited, said this in her latest monthly healthy living discourse, a platform that reviews the positive role that fruit juice can and does play in a healthy diet

During the series sponsored by Chivita, the nutritionist said Nigerian culture does not recognise fruit as satisfying enough to stand as a diet. This, she noted, is one of the reasons many people do not pay serious attention to fruit consumption.

The expert regretted that the few people who have risen above the confine of unfavourable culture to embrace fruit meal are often confronted with convenience and suitability challenges.

To enjoy the benefits of fruit all seasons, Abiola urged health-cautious and busy individuals to embrace 100% pure fruit juice, which she described as a perfect substitute for whole fruits.

She, however, cautioned consumers to pay attention to labels while shopping to ensure that they buy pure fruit juice, saying: “If 100% fruit juice is not clearly written on the pack, it is likely not a pure fruit juice.

“The truth is that 100% fruit juice is proven to have similar or exactly same nutrition as fresh juice does, straight from a fruit without added sugar or preservatives. In other words, 100% fruit juice is nutrient-dense beverage that provides vitamins, minerals (folic acid, thiamine and magnesium) and beneficial plant nutrients like polyphenols.

“When fruit juice is 100%, it counts as one portion of fruit, which is not onlyconvenient but also helpful as many Nigerians do not meet their daily fruit quota for the maintenance of good health.

Health

12 Tips To Be Healthy in 2019 -WHO

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World Health Organisation, WHO has given tips on how to make 2019 a healthy year, by kicking unhealthy habits out of your life, like:

-tobacco use

-unhealthy diet

-physical inactivity

-antibiotic misuse

-unsafe food

-alcohol & drug abuse

-unsafe sex

-poor hygiene

-speeding -drunk driving

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Health

Use of Antibiotics in Livestock puts Humans at risk – Medical Expert

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Indiscriminate use of antibiotics in livestock farming has raised serious public health concerns globally. In sub-Saharan Africa and particularly in Nigeria, it is more endemic among poultry farmers.

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infection. When bacteria develops resistance to the antibiotics, it is termed Antibiotic Resistance (ABR), while Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) occurs when disease-causing organisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites) can no longer be killed by antimicrobial agents.

Dr E. Wesangula, AMR Focal Point of the Kenyan Ministry of Health at the just concluded African Conference of Science Journalists, Nairobi, Kenya painted the looming danger to public health as a result of indiscriminate use of antibiotics in animals.

His position reflects the grave concern expressed in Nigeria by the Nigeria Veterinary Medical Association headed by Professor Mohammed Bello Agaie.

Dr Wesangula noted that the use of antibiotics in livestock today is even greater than in humans. The health expert expressed worry that “in many villages, farmers use human antibiotics to treat chicken to control flu-like infection.”

By consuming meat, egg or milk with antibiotics residues, one under-dosed himself by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug, which will make them resistant to many antibiotic drugs when he is sick.

Professor Bello Agaie explained how humans become the victim of the antibiotic used in livestock: “When you use it in food animals, there is a period that has been specified – we call it withdrawal time. For the professionals, that animal should not be slaughtered within that period or else the residues will still be available in the product – either milk or meat.

“So if you eat meat, eggs or drink milk or eat cheese, you’re taking those antibiotics in very low concentrations.”

Professor Agaie said that the practice “is worse in poultry. What we have is people produce a cocktail of drugs – two, three, or four antibiotics which they put into one – whether the birds are sick or not, they keep putting it into the water. They think it will enhance their growth, make them healthier or not come down with any disease.

“While this is happening, the birds are laying eggs, they are maturing as broilers and we are eating them. So we now get exposed to very low concentration of antibiotics and when people go to hospitals when sick they give you drugs, it does not work because you have already been exposed to some sub-lethal concentration of this drugs…. And the organisms themselves have found a way to now dodge the effect of the drugs so the drugs are no more effective.

“The second thing is that even if you say I’m not eating meat, eggs or taking milk, you say you want to go green, you collect faeces from animals – chickens, cow dung, and you fertilize your soil, you will contaminate the soil. So when you plant, the crop also takes the antibiotics,” he explained.

Consuming crops produced with wastes of animals with antibiotics residues also exposes one to the low quantity of the drugs, which will make your microbes develop resistance to antibiotic treatment.

According to Dr Wesangula, about 4.2 million people in Africa are likely to die due to antimicrobial resistance.
The World Bank estimates global healthcare cost of more than $32 trillion by 2050.

It also said that by 2050, the decline in global livestock production could range from a low of 2.6% to a high of 7.5% per year

“There would be a pronounced increase in extreme poverty because of AMR. Of the additional 28.3 million people falling into extreme poverty in 2050 in the high-impact AMR scenario, the vast majority (26.2 million) would live in low-income countries.

Currently, the world is broadly on track to eliminate extreme poverty (at $1.90/day) by 2030, reaching close to the target of less than 3% of people living in extreme poverty. AMR risks putting this target out of reach,” the World Bank 2016 said.

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Entertainment

Kim Kardashian down with skin disease, searches for medication

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Reality TV star, Kim Kardashian West has disclosed she has been suffering from a skin ailment called, Psoriasis.

Kim, who is searching for medication for the ailment said on a Twitter post that she cannot cover it at this point, as it has taken over her body.

“I think the time has come I start a medication for psoriasis. I’ve never seen it like this before and I can’t even cover it at this point. It’s taken over my body. Has anyone tried a medication for psoriasis & what kind works best? Need help ASAP!!!”She tweeted.

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that speeds up the life cycle of skin cells. It causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin.

The extra skin cells form scales and red patches that are itchy and sometimes painful. Psoriasis is a chronic disease that often comes and goes.

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