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NAFDAC, Customs Set Up Joint Committee To Tackle Importation Of Counterfeit Products

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According to a statement signed by the Director, Public Affairs, NAFDAC,  Abubakar Jimoh, the establishment of the joint committee was the fall out of the courtesy visit by Director General of NAFDAC, Professor Moji Adeyeye to the Nigeria Customs Comptroller General, Retired Colonel Hameed Ali recently in Abuja.

The Customs boss said it has become imperative for NAFDAC and NCS to close rank and work together in the interest of Nigerians, particularly the youths and house wives who are exposed to the devastating effects of abuse of codeine containing cough syrups and tramadol illegally shipped into the country.

He pointed out the urgent need for NAFDAC and NCS to put in place quick measures to prevent Nigerian politicians from taking undue advantage of our vulnerable youths and getting them hooked to drugs so they can be used as thugs during electioneering campaigns.

In her response, NAFDAC DG, Professor Adeyeye hinted that the newly established joint committee will come up with action plan on Intensive Education, Training and Foreign Exchange Programme for personnel of both Agencies as well as joint enforcement operations.

She said other areas of collaboration include timely examination of suspected containers based on intelligence report, regular invitation of NAFDAC officials to participate in examination of NAFDAC regulated products, support to NAFDAC to prevent clearing agents from false declaration of consignments and timely release of containers to NAFDAC for destruction after seizure notice has been submitted to NCS.

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Health

12 Tips To Be Healthy in 2019 -WHO

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World Health Organisation, WHO has given tips on how to make 2019 a healthy year, by kicking unhealthy habits out of your life, like:

-tobacco use

-unhealthy diet

-physical inactivity

-antibiotic misuse

-unsafe food

-alcohol & drug abuse

-unsafe sex

-poor hygiene

-speeding -drunk driving

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Health

Use of Antibiotics in Livestock puts Humans at risk – Medical Expert

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Indiscriminate use of antibiotics in livestock farming has raised serious public health concerns globally. In sub-Saharan Africa and particularly in Nigeria, it is more endemic among poultry farmers.

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infection. When bacteria develops resistance to the antibiotics, it is termed Antibiotic Resistance (ABR), while Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) occurs when disease-causing organisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites) can no longer be killed by antimicrobial agents.

Dr E. Wesangula, AMR Focal Point of the Kenyan Ministry of Health at the just concluded African Conference of Science Journalists, Nairobi, Kenya painted the looming danger to public health as a result of indiscriminate use of antibiotics in animals.

His position reflects the grave concern expressed in Nigeria by the Nigeria Veterinary Medical Association headed by Professor Mohammed Bello Agaie.

Dr Wesangula noted that the use of antibiotics in livestock today is even greater than in humans. The health expert expressed worry that “in many villages, farmers use human antibiotics to treat chicken to control flu-like infection.”

By consuming meat, egg or milk with antibiotics residues, one under-dosed himself by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug, which will make them resistant to many antibiotic drugs when he is sick.

Professor Bello Agaie explained how humans become the victim of the antibiotic used in livestock: “When you use it in food animals, there is a period that has been specified – we call it withdrawal time. For the professionals, that animal should not be slaughtered within that period or else the residues will still be available in the product – either milk or meat.

“So if you eat meat, eggs or drink milk or eat cheese, you’re taking those antibiotics in very low concentrations.”

Professor Agaie said that the practice “is worse in poultry. What we have is people produce a cocktail of drugs – two, three, or four antibiotics which they put into one – whether the birds are sick or not, they keep putting it into the water. They think it will enhance their growth, make them healthier or not come down with any disease.

“While this is happening, the birds are laying eggs, they are maturing as broilers and we are eating them. So we now get exposed to very low concentration of antibiotics and when people go to hospitals when sick they give you drugs, it does not work because you have already been exposed to some sub-lethal concentration of this drugs…. And the organisms themselves have found a way to now dodge the effect of the drugs so the drugs are no more effective.

“The second thing is that even if you say I’m not eating meat, eggs or taking milk, you say you want to go green, you collect faeces from animals – chickens, cow dung, and you fertilize your soil, you will contaminate the soil. So when you plant, the crop also takes the antibiotics,” he explained.

Consuming crops produced with wastes of animals with antibiotics residues also exposes one to the low quantity of the drugs, which will make your microbes develop resistance to antibiotic treatment.

According to Dr Wesangula, about 4.2 million people in Africa are likely to die due to antimicrobial resistance.
The World Bank estimates global healthcare cost of more than $32 trillion by 2050.

It also said that by 2050, the decline in global livestock production could range from a low of 2.6% to a high of 7.5% per year

“There would be a pronounced increase in extreme poverty because of AMR. Of the additional 28.3 million people falling into extreme poverty in 2050 in the high-impact AMR scenario, the vast majority (26.2 million) would live in low-income countries.

Currently, the world is broadly on track to eliminate extreme poverty (at $1.90/day) by 2030, reaching close to the target of less than 3% of people living in extreme poverty. AMR risks putting this target out of reach,” the World Bank 2016 said.

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Entertainment

Kim Kardashian down with skin disease, searches for medication

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Reality TV star, Kim Kardashian West has disclosed she has been suffering from a skin ailment called, Psoriasis.

Kim, who is searching for medication for the ailment said on a Twitter post that she cannot cover it at this point, as it has taken over her body.

“I think the time has come I start a medication for psoriasis. I’ve never seen it like this before and I can’t even cover it at this point. It’s taken over my body. Has anyone tried a medication for psoriasis & what kind works best? Need help ASAP!!!”She tweeted.

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that speeds up the life cycle of skin cells. It causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin.

The extra skin cells form scales and red patches that are itchy and sometimes painful. Psoriasis is a chronic disease that often comes and goes.

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