Connect with us

Health

Academy of Pharmacy makes case for safe & affordable medicines; supports scientific research with Centre

Published

on

 

The Nigeria Academy of Pharmacy has made a passionate case for better, safer, more convenient and more affordable medicines and treatment regimens for diseases that afflict mankind, especially those that are endemic to our region of the world at its annual Investiture ceremony in Lagos.

The well attended occasion was marked by the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award to Chief Oludolapo Ibukun Akinkugbe for his huge contribution to the growth of pharmaceutical sector in Nigeria while General Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma bagged an Honorary Fellowship of the Nigeria Academy of Pharmacy.

Speaking, President, Nigeria Academy of Pharmacy, Prince Julius Adelusi-Adeluyi noted that the “bestowal of the award on Chief Oludolapo Ibukun Akinkugbe is a token of our appreciation of his enormous strides not only in the Pharmacy profession but indeed in all other aspects of human endeavor. As he turns 90 in December, it is only fitting and proper that his number one constituency, Pharmacy, kicks off the celebration of an illustrious role model whose legacy of love, sacrifice and service would be forever etched in our hearts and minds.”

“It is in the same vein that we induct General Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma’s investiture as only the second ever Honorary Fellow of the Academy. He remains one of the most passionate supporters of the Pharmacy profession and a most generous benefactor of scientific research,” he added.

According to Adelusi-Adeluyi, “the Academy of Pharmacy owes society a duty to help unravel better, safer, more convenient and more affordable medicines and treatment regimens for diseases that afflict mankind, especially those that are endemic to our region of the world.”

The high point of this year’s ceremony was the announcement of the Academy’s Research and Innovation Center which is named after Chief Oludolapo Akinkugbe. According to the Academy, this is a vehicle we created to give enduring impact to research and development in Nigeria’s Pharmaceutical space.

????????????????????????????????????

“It is for this reason that research is central to our operations, one of the major reasons, indeed, that the Academy came to being. We want to complement local and international efforts that support scientific research and research activities. Much of the work we have done in this regard has been in the area of advocacy, in engaging government and policy makers on the essence of scientific research and why it is critical to provide better funding and other moral support to scientific research focused institutions as well as individual researchers.”

General Danjuma who is also the Chairman of May and Baker Nigeria Plc, donated N10 million to the Olu Akinkugbe Research and Innovation Centre to support the advancement of research and development in the country.

Professor Ernest Benson Izevbigie, a distinguished scientist and former Vice Chancellor, Benson Idahosa University, in his keynote lecture at the event titled, From Plant to Patient: Driving Research and Innovation for Industry called for the translation of research findings into societal values.

Prof. Izevbigie whose ground-breaking work on the use of bitter leaf, Vernonia Amygdalina in cancer and diabetes management has commanded critical acclaim globally provided critical research insights into how he has used bitter leaf in the management of breast cancer, prostate cancer and cervical cancer with results better than western drugs.

The Nigeria Academy of Pharmacy is a specialized academy that among others, seeks to promote scientific research and professional development especially in the health, pharmaceutical and related sectors in order to help overcome challenges posed by pain and disease as well as fast-track social and economic development in Nigeria and beyond.

The event had eminent personalities that included, Senator Daisy Danjuma, Prof. Oladipo Akinkugbe, professor of medicine, Chief Oba Otudeko, former chairman of First Bank Plc, Pharm. Jimi Agbaje, managing director, JayKay Pharmacy; Pharm. Ike Onyechi, managing director, Alpha Pharmacy; Pharm. Nnamdi Okafor, managing director, May & Baker Plc, Bhushan Akshikar, managing director, Glaxosmithkline Plc, Dr Obi Peter Adigwe, the newly appointed Director General,  National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development (NIPRD), NAPharm Vice President, Sir Ifeanyi Atueyi, chairman, Merit Pharmaceuticals, Dr Lolu Ojo, Pharm. Nnamdi Obi, Mazi Sam Ohuabunwa, former managing director, Neimeth Pharmaceuticals,  Founder, Alpha Pharmacy, Sir Ike Onyechi, Prof. Kemi Odukoya, former dean, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos (UNILAG); Prof. Mbang Femi-Oyewo, former dean, Faculty of Pharmacy, Olabisi Onabanjo University (OOU) amongst others in attendance.

 

Health

12 Tips To Be Healthy in 2019 -WHO

Published

on

 

World Health Organisation, WHO has given tips on how to make 2019 a healthy year, by kicking unhealthy habits out of your life, like:

-tobacco use

-unhealthy diet

-physical inactivity

-antibiotic misuse

-unsafe food

-alcohol & drug abuse

-unsafe sex

-poor hygiene

-speeding -drunk driving

Continue Reading

Health

Use of Antibiotics in Livestock puts Humans at risk – Medical Expert

Published

on

Indiscriminate use of antibiotics in livestock farming has raised serious public health concerns globally. In sub-Saharan Africa and particularly in Nigeria, it is more endemic among poultry farmers.

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infection. When bacteria develops resistance to the antibiotics, it is termed Antibiotic Resistance (ABR), while Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) occurs when disease-causing organisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites) can no longer be killed by antimicrobial agents.

Dr E. Wesangula, AMR Focal Point of the Kenyan Ministry of Health at the just concluded African Conference of Science Journalists, Nairobi, Kenya painted the looming danger to public health as a result of indiscriminate use of antibiotics in animals.

His position reflects the grave concern expressed in Nigeria by the Nigeria Veterinary Medical Association headed by Professor Mohammed Bello Agaie.

Dr Wesangula noted that the use of antibiotics in livestock today is even greater than in humans. The health expert expressed worry that “in many villages, farmers use human antibiotics to treat chicken to control flu-like infection.”

By consuming meat, egg or milk with antibiotics residues, one under-dosed himself by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug, which will make them resistant to many antibiotic drugs when he is sick.

Professor Bello Agaie explained how humans become the victim of the antibiotic used in livestock: “When you use it in food animals, there is a period that has been specified – we call it withdrawal time. For the professionals, that animal should not be slaughtered within that period or else the residues will still be available in the product – either milk or meat.

“So if you eat meat, eggs or drink milk or eat cheese, you’re taking those antibiotics in very low concentrations.”

Professor Agaie said that the practice “is worse in poultry. What we have is people produce a cocktail of drugs – two, three, or four antibiotics which they put into one – whether the birds are sick or not, they keep putting it into the water. They think it will enhance their growth, make them healthier or not come down with any disease.

“While this is happening, the birds are laying eggs, they are maturing as broilers and we are eating them. So we now get exposed to very low concentration of antibiotics and when people go to hospitals when sick they give you drugs, it does not work because you have already been exposed to some sub-lethal concentration of this drugs…. And the organisms themselves have found a way to now dodge the effect of the drugs so the drugs are no more effective.

“The second thing is that even if you say I’m not eating meat, eggs or taking milk, you say you want to go green, you collect faeces from animals – chickens, cow dung, and you fertilize your soil, you will contaminate the soil. So when you plant, the crop also takes the antibiotics,” he explained.

Consuming crops produced with wastes of animals with antibiotics residues also exposes one to the low quantity of the drugs, which will make your microbes develop resistance to antibiotic treatment.

According to Dr Wesangula, about 4.2 million people in Africa are likely to die due to antimicrobial resistance.
The World Bank estimates global healthcare cost of more than $32 trillion by 2050.

It also said that by 2050, the decline in global livestock production could range from a low of 2.6% to a high of 7.5% per year

“There would be a pronounced increase in extreme poverty because of AMR. Of the additional 28.3 million people falling into extreme poverty in 2050 in the high-impact AMR scenario, the vast majority (26.2 million) would live in low-income countries.

Currently, the world is broadly on track to eliminate extreme poverty (at $1.90/day) by 2030, reaching close to the target of less than 3% of people living in extreme poverty. AMR risks putting this target out of reach,” the World Bank 2016 said.

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Kim Kardashian down with skin disease, searches for medication

Published

on

 

Reality TV star, Kim Kardashian West has disclosed she has been suffering from a skin ailment called, Psoriasis.

Kim, who is searching for medication for the ailment said on a Twitter post that she cannot cover it at this point, as it has taken over her body.

“I think the time has come I start a medication for psoriasis. I’ve never seen it like this before and I can’t even cover it at this point. It’s taken over my body. Has anyone tried a medication for psoriasis & what kind works best? Need help ASAP!!!”She tweeted.

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that speeds up the life cycle of skin cells. It causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin.

The extra skin cells form scales and red patches that are itchy and sometimes painful. Psoriasis is a chronic disease that often comes and goes.

Continue Reading

Trending